Introduction to Plenny Pot v1.0

 

  

Plenny Pot is a healthy, convenient, and nutritionally complete instant hot meal that is balanced in nutrients (high in protein,100% plant based, a source of fibre and low in sugar). It also contains pro- and prebiotics for a healthy gut. We topped it all off with our high quality mix of 26 essential vitamins and minerals your body needs to stay healthy.

Plenny Pot is our first savoury product that can be enjoyed warm! Just add boiling water, wait a little and enjoy an instant hot and nutritious lunch or dinner! 

The Plenny Pot comes in three different types: Creamy Cajun Pasta, Tikka Masala and Vegetable Korma Rice. They provide you with 400 calories of which 20% comes from protein, 25-29% from fat, 45-52% from carbohydrates, and  3-6% from fibres, depending on the flavour.

Did we pique your curiosity? Keep reading if you want to know more!

Macronutrients
•  Proteins
•  Fats
•  Carbohydrates

Micronutrients

 

Nutritional breakdown 

Per portion (300g)

Creamy Cajun Pasta v1.0

Tikka Masala Lentils v1.0

Vegetable Korma Rice v1.0

Nutrition

Value

%RI

Value

%RI

Value

%RI

Energy

400 kcal

20%

400 kcal

20%

400 kcal

20%

Protein

20 g

40%

20 g

40%

20 g

40%

Fat

13 g

19%

12 g

17%

11 g

16%

From which saturated fats

2,1 g

11%

4,5 g

23%

3,1 g

16%

Carbohydrate

45 g

17%

50 g

19%

52 g

20%

From which sugar

11 g

12%

10,9 g

12%

5,2 g

6%

Fibres

12 g

8,9 g

6,5 g

  

Ingredients

Creamy Cajun Pasta 

Tikka  Masala Lentils

Vegetable Korma Rice

  • Wholemeal pasta
  • Plant protein 
    • Pea protein isolate
    • Soy protein isolate
  • Sunflower oil powder
  • Tomato powder
  • Dried vegetables
  • Coconut milk powder
  • Black beans 
  • Cajun seasoning
  • Chicory root fibre
  • Vitamin and mineral mix
  • Glucose syrup
  • Flaxseed 
  • Natural flavour: celery
  • Salt
  • Garlic powder
  • Onion powder
  • Cracked black Pepper
  • White wine vinegar powder 
  • Coriander
  • Probiotic: Bacillus Coagulans 
  • White rice 
  • Plant protein
    • Pea protein isolate
    • Soy protein isolate
  • Green lentils 
  • Tomato powder
  • Coconut milk powder
  • Dried vegetables
  • Vitamin and mineral mix 
  • Coconut oil powder
  • Curry seasoning
  • Sunflower oil powder
  • Chicory root fibre
  • Cumin
  • Potato starch
  • Salt
  • Coriander
  • Coconut sugar
  • Flaxseed
  • Garlic powder
  • Onion powder
  • Lime powder
  • Maltodextrin
  • Paprika
  • Ginger
  • Natural colouring: beet red
  • Probiotic: Bacillus Coagulans 
  • White rice 
  • Plant protein 
    • Pea protein isolate
    • Soy protein isolate
  • Coconut milk powder
  • Sunflower oil powder
  • Curry seasoning
  • Potato starch
  • Vitamin and mineral mix
  • Chicory root fibre
  • Glucose syrup
  • Flaxseed
  • Salt
  • Natural flavour: Celery, mustard
  • Turmeric
  • Garlic powder
  • Onion powder
  • Coriander
  • Cracked black pepper
  • Lime powder
  • Probiotic: Bacillus Coagulans 

 

Macronutrients

Proteins

Proteins are essential in your diet, being the building-block of essential compounds in your body and giving your body its structure. Since we cannot go without this nutrient, each portion of Plenny Pot provides 20 gram of protein so that you hit the daily recommended intakes. You can read more about how much protein you really need here! A meal such as Plenny Pot, which is high in protein can make you feel more satiated throughout the day because proteins take longer to digest than carbohydrates. The main protein sources in the product are pea- and soy protein. In addition, the black beans added to the Tikka Masala also contribute to its protein content. Want to read more about vegan protein sources? Read this article!  (1,2)

 

Fats

Most of the fats in the Plenny pot come from sunflower oil. Sunflower oil has mainly monounsaturated fats and a great amount of omega-6 and omega-3. Your body can't make these omega 3 and 6 on its own; reason for which it should be present in your food. Because we don’t want to leave you hanging with the omega-3’s, we also add flaxseed because of its high content of α-Linolenic acid (omega-3) and linoleic acid (omega-6).  Lastly, the coconut milk adds up to the total fat content. Coconut milk is often put in a bad light due to its saturated fatty acids. Nevertheless, the Plenny pot has a saturated fatty acid content between 2,1 - 4,5 grams, which is far below the recommended upper limit of 10 E%. Moreover, coconut milk consists of medium chain triglycerides (MCT), on which ongoing research suggests to have a positive effect on weight loss, fat loss, energy burning and improving your gut environment (3–11). 

  

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are a nutrient that provides your body with glucose, the main energy source for the brain (8). The group of carbohydrates can be split up in categories such as sugars and starches, which both provide you with this essential nutrient.  A required daily intake of 130 gram per day for adults has been established by The Institute of Medicine (IOM), to provide the brain with this fuel (9). Plenny Pot contains 45-52 gram of carbohydrates per meal, which makes a diet solely based on this product provide you with the sufficient amount of this nutrient. The carbohydrates present in the Plenny Pot are a combination of complex and easier to digest ones. More specifically, white rice, glucose syrup and maltodextrin are added and function as a form of immediate energy. To provide long-lasting energy and to prevent a sugar peak or dip, some complementary sources have been added: the Tikka Masala and Vegetable Korma Rice varieties contain potato starch, which is a resistant starch that functions as a fermentable fibre. The Creamy Cajun Pasta contains wholemeal pasta, which also contributes to a slower digestion and blood glucose rise. Resistant starch is shown to improve insulin sensitivity and lower blood glucose levels after meals. Moreover, it feeds the beneficial bacteria in the gut and contributes to a healthful gut-environment.  

 

Plenny Pot v.1 is low sugar to enhance the taste of the products, a pinch of coconut sugar is added to the Plenny Pot Tikka Masala. Yet, all varieties of the Plenny Pot are considered low in sugar and vary between 1,7g - 3,6g per 100 gram (12–19).

 

Fibres

To smoothen your digestive system, some extra fibres have been added to the Plenny Pot in the amounts of 6,5-12 grams per portion. This amount is based on recommendations by authorities such as the Dutch Health Council and the American Heart Association, defining 30-40 grams of fibre per day or 25 grams of fibre in a 2,000 calorie diet (15,16).  The main sources of fibres in the Plenny Pot are chicory root fibre, wholemeal pasta, potato starch, flaxseed and the pulses. They help in lowering the blood pressure and smoothen your digestion. In particular chicory root fibre is added to achieve a wider variety of fibre sources and upgrade the number of fibres per portion. This results in the Tikka Masala and Vegetable Korma rice being a source of fibre and Creamy Cajun pasta being high in fibre! (12,20–22)

Moreover, probiotics are added because of their ability to possibly enhance and strengthen our gut microbiome. The probiotics have a symbiotic effect with the high fibre content of Plenny Pot. This means that probiotics become more resistant and provide a stronger health effect thanks to the fibres which they eat and live from.You can read more about gut health in this article (23).

  

Micronutrients

The vitamin and mineral mix that we add to the product provides all 26 needed micronutrients. We use the most bioavailable forms of the micronutrients so that your body can absorb each bit of all the vitamins and minerals easily and at the highest rate. For instance, we add vitamin D in the form of cholecalciferol (D3) and vitamin K in the form of menaquinone-7 (K2 MK7). You can read more about our micronutrient mix here.

It is discussed that vitamins can be degraded by heat so in order to ensure that we are providing you with the correct amounts, overages have been included into the formula to incorporate this loss. Overages can range from 20-50% depending on the vitamin. Minerals, however, are not affected by heat.  

Besides the nutritional advantages of Plenny Pot, they get their tastiness from a bunch of spice and dried vegetables. Can’t wait to try out our first savoury product? Make your order here!

 

Vitamins and minerals  

One portion 

 RI%*

Vitamina A

160 μg

20%*

Vitamin D

5,0 μg

100%*

Vitamin E

4,0 mg

33%*

Vitamin K

16 μg 

21%*

Vitamin C

40 mg

50%*

Thiamin

0,4 mg

36%*

Riboflavin

0,3 mg

23%*

Niacin

3,6 mg

23%*

Vitamin B6

0,4 mg

29%*

Folic Acid

60 μg

30%*

Vitamin B12 

3,2 μg

128%*

Biotin

10 μg

20%*

Pantothenic acid

1,2 mg

20%*

Potassium

400 mg

20%*

Chloride

279 mg

35%*

Calcium

185 mg

23%*

Phosphorus

140 mg

20%*

Magnesium

75 mg

20%*

Iron

3,2 mg

23%*

Zinc

2,0 mg

20%*

Copper

0,4 mg

40%*

Manganese

1,0 mg

50%*

Selenium

18 μg

33%*

Chromium

8,0 μg

20%*

Molybdenum

13 μg

26%*

Iodine

30 μg

20%*

* % of the daily reference intake (RI) for vitamins and minerals
** Reference intake of an average adult (8400 kJ/2000 kcal)

Sources

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  1. Pendick D. How much protein do you need every day? [Internet]. Harvard Health Blog. 2015 [cited 2020 Apr 9]. Available from: https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/how-much-protein-do-you-need-every-day-201506188096
  2. St-Onge M-P, Jones PJH. Greater rise in fat oxidation with medium-chain triglyceride consumption relative to long-chain triglyceride is associated with lower initial body weight and greater loss of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord J Int Assoc Study Obes. 2003 Dec;27(12):1565–71.
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  9. Boston 677 Huntington Avenue, Ma 02115 +1495‑1000. Types of Fat [Internet]. The Nutrition Source. 2014 [cited 2020 Apr 9]. Available from: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/fats-and-cholesterol/types-of-fat/
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