Introduction to Jimmy Joy Plenny Bar v3.0

 

Plenny Bar is a 100% vegan meal bar that’s exactly 400 kcal. It’s made of natural and plant-based ingredients like oats, rice, soy, tapioca, rapeseed oil, brown flaxseed, and chicory. We’ve also added a custom blend of 26 vitamins & minerals and probiotics. As a result, each bar contains a whopping 172 health benefits. And no, that’s no typo! That’s backed up by research from the European Food Safety Authority. 

You can get Plenny Bar in 8 delicious flavours.

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Caramel Sea Salt 
  • Hazelnut Coffee
  • Almond & Fig
  • Apfelstrudel
  • Mocha 
  • Cherry

At this point, you are probably wondering what exactly is inside the bar. Well, keep reading! 

Nutritional breakdown

Vanilla

Chocolate

Caramel Sea Salt

Nutrition

Value

%RI

Value

%RI

Value

%RI

Energy

400 kcal

20%

400 kcal

20%

400 kcal

20%

Protein

20 g

40%

20 g

42%

20 g

40%

Fat

17 g

23%

18g

26%

18 g

26%

From which saturated fats

1,4 g

7%

1,7 g

9%

1,4 g

7%

Carbohydrate

38 g

15%

38 g

15%

37 g

14%

From which sugar

4,9 g

5%

4,7 g

5%

4,3 g

5%

Fibres

7,9 g

8,1 g

8,6 g

 

Almond & Fig

Apfelstrudel 

Mocha 

Nutrition

Value

%RI

Value

% RI

Value

%RI

Energy

400 kcal

20%

400 kcal

20%

400 kcal 

20 % 

Protein

20 g

40%

20 g

40%

20 g

40%

Fat

18 g

26%

18 g

26%

18 g

26%

From which saturated fats

1,7 g

9%

1,4 g

7%

1,5 g

8%

Carbohydrate

37 g

14%

39 g

15%

38 g

15%

From which sugar

8,4 g

9%

7,0 g

8%

4,6 g

5%

Fibres

7,9 g

8,2 g

8,0

Plenny Bar Cherry

Nutrition

Value

%RI

Energy

400 kcal

20%

Protein

20 g

40%

Fat

18 g

26%

Saturated fat

1,4 g

7%

Carbohydrates

38 g

15%

Sugar

7 g

8%

Fibre

7,5 g

 

 

Ingredients

All Plenny Bar flavours contain the following ingredients:

  • Oats
  • Dehydrated rice extract
  • Soy protein crisp (soy protein isolate, tapioca starch, stabiliser: calcium carbonate, salt)
  • Rapeseed oil
  • Milled brown flaxseed
  • Soy protein isolate
  • Custom blend of 26 vitamins and minerals
  • Probiotic: Bacillus coagulans
  • Sweetener: sucralose 

Depending on the flavour, Plenny Bars can also contain:

  • Real fruit 
  • Nuts 
  • Cacao 
  • Ground coffee
  • Sea salt

    Protein

    Protein functions as essential building-blocks for different structures in your body. To ensure that you get enough of this nutrient, the European Food Safety Authority recommends an amount of 0,83 grams of protein per kg body weight per day.


    Plenny Bar contains 20g of protein per serving, which fits perfectly within this recommendation. The main source of protein is soy, which is considered the best vegan protein source due to its digestibility, absorption rate, and because it contains all nine essential amino acids. You can read more about this here!

    Fat

    Among other things, fat contributes to a well-functioning brain and muscles. That’s why Plenny Bars have an average of 17.8 grams of fat per serving (3). Although oats and soy bring a little bit of fat to the mix, rapeseed oil is the main source. Why rapeseed oil? Compared to sunflower oil, rapeseed oil is lower in saturated fats and contains a little more omega 3 and less omega 6.

    Carbohydrates

    Carbohydrates are a nutrient that provides your body with glucose, the main source of energy for your brain. That’s a daily intake of around 130 grams is recommended (4,5). One Plenny Bar contains 40 grams of carbohydrates, which fits perfectly within this recommendation. The main source of carbohydrates in Plenny Bars is oats.

    As you may know, carbohydrates increase your blood sugar levels after digestion. This can be measured by the glycemic index, which is high when easily digestible carbohydrates are consumed, and lower when carbohydrates with a more complex structure are consumed (6,7). Plenny Bar has a low GI of 33.8, which means a slow energy release: the carbohydrates will enter into your bloodstream slow and steady. No energy peak or crash! In addition, oats are rich in beta-glucan, which slows down your digestion (8). 

    So what about sugar? Plenny Bars have an average of 5.4 grams of sugar per 100 grams. This is well below the recommended upper limit of 10 E% sugar (9) and close to being ‘low in sugar’. 

    The following flavours are low in sugar:

    • Vanilla (4.9 g)
    • Chocolate (4.7 g)
    • Caramel Sea Salt (4.3 g)
    • Mocha (4.6 g)

    Fibre

    With an average of 8.1 g fibre, Plenny Bar is high in fibre! The fibre comes from oats, chicory fibre, and soy protein crisps. Fibre increases satiety, helps with your digestion, and improves the health of your intestinal bacteria. Read more about that here!

    Micronutrients

    Every Plenny Bar has 26 vitamins and minerals in amounts that are ideal for absorption and recommended by the European Food Safety Authority (10). These micronutrients play an important role in most of the processes happening in your body, such as cellular functions, neurotransmission, fluid balance, and tissue structure (11,12).

    Can’t wait to benefit from the tasty and nutritional advantages of the Plenny Bar? Make your order here!


    Micronutrients per bar (100g) 

    Vitamins & Minerals per

    100 g***

     RI%**

    Vitamine/Vitamin A 

    160

    μg

    20%*

    Vitamine/Vitamin D 

    5,0

    μg

    100%*

    Vitamine/Vitamin E 

    4,0

    mg

    33%*

    Vitamine/Vitamin K 

    16

    μg

    21%*

    Vitamine/Vitamin C 

    40

    mg

    50%*

    Thiamine/Thiamin

    0,40

    mg

    36%*

    Riboflavine/Riboflavin 

    0,3

    mg

    23%*

    Niacine/Niacin 

    3,6

    mg

    23%*

    Vitamine/Vitamin B6

    0,40

    mg

    29%*

    Foliumzuur/Folic acid 

    60

    μg

    30%*

    Vitamine/Vitamin B12 

    3,2

    μg

    128%*

    Biotine/Biotin 

    10

    μg

    20%*

    Pantotheenzuur/Pantothenic acid 

    1,2

    mg

    20%*

    Kalium/Potassium

    400

    mg

    20%*

    Chloride/Chloride 

    279

    mg

    35%*

    Calcium/Calcium 

    185

    mg

    23%*

    Fosfor/Phosphorus

    140

    mg

    20%*

    Magnesium/Magnesium

    75

    mg

    20%*

    IJzer/Iron

    3,2

    mg

    23%*

    Zink/Zinc

    2,0

    mg

    20%*

    Koper/Copper

    0,40

    mg

    40%*

    Mangaan/Manganese

    1,0

    mg

    50%*

    Seleen/Selenium

    18

    μg

    33%*

    Chroom/Chromium

    8,0

    μg

    20%*

    Molybdeen/Molybdenum

    13

    μg

    26%*

    Jood/Iodine 

    30

    μg

    20%*

    *% of the daily reference intake (RI) for vitamins and minerals
    **Reference intake of an average adult (8400 kJ/2000 kcal)
    ***serving = 100 gram ℮

    *% of the daily reference intake for vitamins and minerals


    Sources

    1. WHO | Protein and amino acid requirements in human nutrition [Internet]. WHO. World Health Organization; [cited 2020 Apr 7]. Available from: http://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/nutrientrequirements/WHO_TRS_935/en/
    2. Eiwitten | Voedingscentrum [Internet]. [cited 2020 Feb 19]. Available from: https://www.voedingscentrum.nl/encyclopedie/eiwitten.aspx#blok7
    3. WHO | Fats and fatty acids in human nutrition [Internet]. WHO. World Health Organization; [cited 2020 Apr 7]. Available from: https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/nutrientrequirements/fatsandfattyacids_humannutrition/en/
    4. Slavin J, Carlson J. Carbohydrates1. Adv Nutr. 2014 Nov 3;5(6):760–1.
    5. Medicine I of. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids [Internet]. 2002 [cited 2020 Apr 9]. Available from: https://www.nap.edu/catalog/10490/dietary-reference-intakes-for-energy-carbohydrate-fiber-fat-fatty-acids-cholesterol-protein-and-amino-acids
    6. Publishing HH. A good guide to good carbs: The glycemic index [Internet]. Harvard Health. [cited 2020 Apr 9]. Available from: https://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/a-good-guide-to-good-carbs-the-glycemic-index
    7. Lamothe LM, Lê K-A, Samra RA, Roger O, Green H, Macé K. The scientific basis for healthful carbohydrate profile. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2019 Apr 12;59(7):1058–70.
    8. Oats | The Nutrition Source | Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health [Internet]. [cited 2020 Apr 9]. Available from: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/food-features/oats/
    9. World Health Organization. Reducing free sugars intake in children and adults [Internet]. WHO. World Health Organization; 2017 [cited 2020 Mar 25]. Available from: https://www.who.int/elena/titles/guidance_summaries/sugars_intake/en/
    10. 10.   Regulation (EU) No 1169/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2011
    11. Duggan C, Fawzi W. Micronutrients and child health: studies in international nutrition and HIV infection. Nutr Rev. 2001 Nov;59(11):358–69.
    12. 12Publishing HH. Micronutrients have major impact on health [Internet]. Harvard Health. [cited 2020 Apr 9]. Available from: https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/micronutrients-have-major-impact-on-health